Tag Archive for Japanese Fiction

New Books Posted, Oct 2011 & Free Shipping Offer!

FREESHIPFTW is back! Free Shipping within Philippines (conditions apply).

Conditions to avail of free shipping within the Philippines for the October 2011:

1. Products included in this Free Shipping Offer: Books only. For “over-sized” books we will inform you availability of this offer.
2. Minimum purchase of PhP800.00. Transaction must be paid within a *reasonable* period.
3. Moleskine, Fashionary, Novelty and non-books items not included.
4. Your mailing address must be a regular service area of 2GO. If you opt for LBC because of 2GO’s non-serviceable area or other services Free Shipping won’t apply. Sorry!

Valid until October 31, 2011.

To use, process and checkout your order regularly by providing shipping and payment details. Before you submit your final order the system will request if you want to use a Coupon Code, type: FREESHIPFTW

FREESHIPFTW is only valid for book orders above PhP800.00.

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Here are some new books postings for October, 2011.

The Dark Tower & Other Stories by C.S. Lewis
The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters by Gordon Dahlquist
Grotesque by Natsuo Kirino
The Best American Erotica 2007 (Edited by Susie Bright)
You Suck: A Love Story by Christopher Moore
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust
The Past Recaptured by Marcel Proust
Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt by Anne Rice
One Hundred and One Famous Poems
Jim Morrison: The Lords and The New Creatures Poems
The Best American Poetry 2003 (Yusef Komunyakaa)
Foul Play!: The Art and Artists of the Notorious 1950s E.C. Comics!
Frank R. Paul: Father of Science Fiction Art (HB)

 

 

Dictionary of Theories: One stop to more than 5,000 theories
100 Most Dangerous Things in Everyday Life by Laura Lee
The Pocket Dangerous Book for Boys: Things To Do (HB)
The Inner Reaches of Outer Space by Joseph Campbell
The Ig Nobel Prizes 2 by Marc Abrahams (Hardbound)
The Fundamentals of Creative Design by Gavin Ambrose and Paul Harris
Don’t Know Much About Anything by Kenneth C. Davis
Wabi-Sabi: for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers
Michelangelo & the Pope’s Ceiilng by Ross King
Introducing The Universe (Comics Graphic Format)
Buddha For Beginners (Comic Graphic Form) by Stephen T. Asma
The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould (1981)
This Book of More Perfectly Useless Information by Mitchell Symons (HB)
The Case for Christianity by C.S. Lewis
The Barbie Chronicles: A Living Doll Turns Forty
That’s Not in my American History Book by Thomas Ayres
Encyclopedia of Celtic Wisdom by Caitlin & John Matthews

Happy Book Shopping!

www.avalon.ph

Hard-to-find Norwegian Wood edition (Kondasha)

Hard-to-find copy of Haruku Murakami’s Norwegian Wood, translated by Alfred Birnbaum instead of Jay Rubin. Comes in 2 books. Kondasha International, softcover.

Price is Php2,400.00 for both.Update: sold after 30 minutes of post.

If interested, contact us.

Norwegian Wood

 

Raw Images (Books – 05/23/11)

For inquiries please use this link, it is the most efficient way for us to read and reply to your message. Please be considerate and immediately settle the transaction if you reserve/order any.

Most books in this batch are in very good-good condition slightly used. Some may have price stickers/used book tags (please excuse this). There are no junks, you will be notified if condition deserves some clarification before purchase.

CLICK on the image you want to view, and click again to zoom them. Happy viewing!

 

Raw Images (Books – 03/02/11)

For inquiries please use this link, it is the most efficient way for us to read and reply to your message. Please be considerate and immediately settle the transaction if you reserve/order any.

Most books in this batch are in very good-good condition slightly used. Some may have price stickers/used book tags. There are no junks, you will be notified if condition deserves some clarification before purchase.

CLICK on the image you want to view, and click again to zoom them. Happy viewing!

 

Raw Images (Books – 01/15/11)

For inquiries please use this link, it is the most efficient way for us to read and reply to your message. Please be considerate and immediately settle the transaction if you reserve/order any.

Most books in this batch are in very good-good condition USED. Some may have price stickers/used book tags. There are no junks, you will be notified if condition deserves some clarification before purchase.

CLICK on the image you want to view, and click again to zoom them. Happy viewing!

New Titles Posted, December 2008 (1st)

New Books Posted:

Shopping:

Wizards: The Quest for The Wizard from Merlin to Harry Potter (HB)
Zorro: A Novel by Isabel Allende
Blindness by Jose Saramago
Match Wits with Mensa: The Complete Quiz Book
The Cornelius Quartet by Michael Moorcock
Hannibal Rising by Thomas Harris (Hardbound)
American Gothic Tales (Edited by Joyce Carol Oates)
Dark Delicacies II: Fear
A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby (Hardbound)
The Business of Bullshit by Graham Edmonds
The Fair Folk (Elves/Fairies) Edited by Marvin Kaye
The New Life by Orhan Pamuk
The Math Instinct: Why You’re a Mathematical Genius
High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Riverhead Essential Edition)
Outsiders: 22 All-New Stories from the Edge
Three Days to Never by Tim Powers (Hardbound)
Classic Nasty by Jack Murnighan
Chance: A Guide to Gambling, Love, the Stock Market, & Just About Everything Else
100 Strokes of the Brush Before Bed by Melissa P.
Masterpieces: The Best Science Fiction of the Twentieth Century
Nebula Awards Showcase 2007: The Year’s Best SF and Fantasy
A History of Reading by Alberto Manguel
Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation
The Science of Vampires by Katherine Ramsland

For Auction:

The Sense of Beauty by George Santayana
The Sandman: King of Dreams, 40 Collectible Postcards
The Best Japanese Science Fiction Stories (Out-of-Print)
The Town in the City by Jack Kerouac (1978 edition)
The Science of the X-Men (Out-of-Print)
Super Heroes: A Modern Mythology by Richard Reynolds
Hypermodern Chess: Games of Aron Nimzovich
The Science of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials (HB)
Codes, Ciphers and Secret Writing by Martin Gardner
Fury by Salman Rushdie
The North China Lover by Marguerite Duras
The Ravishing of Lol Stein by Marguerite Duras
The Science of God: The Convergence of Scientific & Biblical
J.R.R. Tolkien: The Silmarillion (Hardbound 1977)
The Arbor House Treasury of Horror and The Supernatural (1981)
The Leopard by Guiseppe Di Lampedusa
Science Fiction of the 30’s (Edited by Damon Knight)
Bloodsucking Fiends: A Love Story by Christopher Moore
Rosebud: The Story of Orson Welles by David Thomson
Celtic Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs
Exile and the Kingdom by Albert Camus
No One Writes to the Colonel by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Jacques and his Master: A Play by Milan Kundera
The Wall: And Other Stories by Sartre
Best-Loved Folktales of the World
Seven Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson
Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D.H. Lawrence
If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino
Women on Women 3: Anthology of American Lesbian Fiction
Franz Kafka: The Metamorphosis, Penal Colony & Other Stories

Book Review: Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto

Kitchen

“I wish to continue living with the awareness that I will die. Without that, I am not alive.”

Other reviews gush about how Banana Yoshimoto wrote about death and personal tragedies sans the wails commonly heard in funerals. I, too, share the same opinion. Yet one thing that confirmed the book’s position in my favorites’ list was the simplicity of the prose. So simple, in fact, that I read it in between Homer and Francis Bacon. The prose reminded me of yoga and gentle breezes. It was such an easy read! This is all the more kudos to Yoshimoto because she dealt with such a serious topic (death), yet she was able to show that writing or talking about death need not be accompanied with gloom. Upon reading Kitchen, it eventually became clear that the text was not merely about death, but was also a coming-of-age story of a young woman who has experienced so much death around her. This makes the story of the female protagonist, Mikage, unique, because she was forced to become independent when she was suddenly left alone to fend for herself.

Coming-of-age stories are usually accompanied with love stories since falling in love is a kind of initiation rite to people coming of age. This situation is not absent in the book. Throughout the process of learning to stand on her own feet, Mikage faced such events that would create a profound bond in her life. The smart juxtaposition of two seemingly incompatible themes (death and coming of age) makes Kitchen one of a kind. With a simple but special writing style to match, this book should just instantly be read.

Overall, the book is a must-read for three kinds of bookworms: 1. to those who want to take a break from the classics 2. to those who think that chick literature is all about silly, materialistic airheads pining away for some hunk 3. to those who do not want to waste their time.

Purchase your copy of this book on Avalon.ph